Bookish Post – September 2022 Reading Wrap-Up

books, wrap-up
Teacup on top of vintage books.

Number of books read: 8
Number of rereads: 0
Number of physical books: 1
Number of ebooks: 1
Number of audiobooks: 6
Number of ARCS: 0

I don’t have much memory if September. I don’t know how we’ve reached the end of it if I’m honest. I certainly didn’t remember any of the books I’d read. It doesn’t feel as though I’ve read anything. Certainly not in the past few weeks. Apparently I just beat last month’s count, so I’m pretty happy with that.

5* reviews: 0
4.5* reviews: 0
4* reviews: 1

Book Review – The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate

books, reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I haven’t had much time for reading this weekend, so my first review of this week is going to be a small one. This was another audiobook that I borrowed from the library. It sounded really cute and I love an anthropomorphic animal tale. Even if it is based on an awful true story. I guess it reminds me of the books I read as a child. There were so many books about animals having crazy adventures. This seemed like a good chance to recapture my childhood as I went about a dull day at work.

Book Review – Max Einstein: Rebels With a Cause by James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein

books, reviews

Rating: 2.5 out of 5.

I know my review of the first book in the Max Einstein series wasn’t exactly glowing but I enjoyed it enough to listen to the next one. Again, it’s a good way to get through all of those work hours when I’m doing repetitive and dull tasks. Anything to make them seem more exciting. So, when this was recommended on my library catalogue, I figured I’d carry on with the series.

Book Review – Max Einstein: The Genius Experiment by James Patterson and Chris Grabenstein

books, reviews

Rating: 3 out of 5.

Sometimes you pick up a book because it sounds like everything you’ve ever wanted. Sometimes you pick up a book because it’s beautiful. Sometimes it’ll be because the author is someone you’ve loved before. Sometimes it might be a title that draws you in. This time? It was length and availability. In fact, that’s happening quite a lot lately. Whichever short books are available via my library’s online catalogue are probably going to be read. This was a book I could finish in a work day and one that I didn’t imagine would require a lot of concentration. It was perfect.

Book Review – The Mystwick School of Musicraft by Jessica Khoury

books, reviews

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I come from a pretty musical family. My parents are both great singers and my sisters and I all played instruments at school. I initially tried out the oboe but couldn’t cope with the double reed. I then moved to the flute and, after a lot of effort, became pretty adequate. So, it was a given that I’d be interested in a book that a magical musical school with a flautist main character. The fact that I could get it free with my Audible account only made it better.

Book Review – Secret Suffragette by Barbara Mitchelhill

books, reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

So, my week’s holiday is over and, after an initial success, my reading went downhill pretty rapidly. Meaning I was in an all too familiar situation for this week’s second book review. I had nothing. Thankfully, my first day back was full of repetitive and dull tasks which allowed me to listen to a quick audiobook. After my previous read, I was in the mood for something that didn’t set women back several decades and one that elevated women. So, this feminist historical novel seemed perfect.

Book Review – A Kind of Spark by Elle McNicoll

books, reviews

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Once again, I found myself in a situation where I needed to listen to an audiobook so I had a book to review. These days, I’m normally reading until Thursday when I have to write my Friday review. Then it’s just not possible to finish a whole book before my next review. This is what happens out of lockdown. I’m so bloody busy. Is this what life was like before? Thankfully, there are plenty of free audiobooks available with my Audible membership. I picked one I’ve seen around for ages and was short enough to finish at work.

Book Review – Loki: A Bad God’s Guide to Being Good by Louie Stowell

books, reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As someone who has made their thoughts about YA very clear, it might seem strange that I enjoy reading Middle-Grade books so much. Maybe it’s because there’s a further distance between me and the intended audience? Maybe it’s because I’m still a child at heart? But I suspect that it’s because children’s writers aren’t trying as hard to fit in with their audience. One of my main criticisms of YA is the way that teenagers are represented. I can’t connect with it. I feel like Middle-Grade fiction is written to both entertain and, in some way, to explain certain aspects of life. It makes it easier for me to stomach. Does that make sense? Probably not.

Bitesize Book Reviews 11

books, reviews
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Once again, I found myself without much to review because I’m still doing terribly at reading. In order to get this post up, I listened to 3 audiobooks on Monday. They were all short and free with my Audible subscription. I guess my lack of organisation is helping me experience books that I’d never have picked up normally. If only I could get through the books on my TBR as easily.

Book Review – The Royal Rabbits of London by Santa Montefiore, Simon Sebag Montefiore

books, reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As kids, my sisters and I were obsessed with any film, TV show or book about animals. Anything that personified animals was perfect. It’s something that hasn’t really left me as I got older, which is why I was so excited to see this in the charity shop. Personified rabbits who are tasked with looking after the Queen? I’m not exactly pro-Royal but that sounded like a lot of fun. I had to buy it and I couldn’t wait to read it. But would it really be as good as it sounded?