Book Review – The Mystwick School of Musicraft by Jessica Khoury

books, reviews

Rating: 3 out of 5.

I come from a pretty musical family. My parents are both great singers and my sisters and I all played instruments at school. I initially tried out the oboe but couldn’t cope with the double reed. I then moved to the flute and, after a lot of effort, became pretty adequate. So, it was a given that I’d be interested in a book that a magical musical school with a flautist main character. The fact that I could get it free with my Audible account only made it better.

Book Review – Secret Suffragette by Barbara Mitchelhill

books, reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

So, my week’s holiday is over and, after an initial success, my reading went downhill pretty rapidly. Meaning I was in an all too familiar situation for this week’s second book review. I had nothing. Thankfully, my first day back was full of repetitive and dull tasks which allowed me to listen to a quick audiobook. After my previous read, I was in the mood for something that didn’t set women back several decades and one that elevated women. So, this feminist historical novel seemed perfect.

Book Review – A Kind of Spark by Elle McNicoll

books, reviews

Rating: 5 out of 5.

Once again, I found myself in a situation where I needed to listen to an audiobook so I had a book to review. These days, I’m normally reading until Thursday when I have to write my Friday review. Then it’s just not possible to finish a whole book before my next review. This is what happens out of lockdown. I’m so bloody busy. Is this what life was like before? Thankfully, there are plenty of free audiobooks available with my Audible membership. I picked one I’ve seen around for ages and was short enough to finish at work.

Book Review – Loki: A Bad God’s Guide to Being Good by Louie Stowell

books, reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As someone who has made their thoughts about YA very clear, it might seem strange that I enjoy reading Middle-Grade books so much. Maybe it’s because there’s a further distance between me and the intended audience? Maybe it’s because I’m still a child at heart? But I suspect that it’s because children’s writers aren’t trying as hard to fit in with their audience. One of my main criticisms of YA is the way that teenagers are represented. I can’t connect with it. I feel like Middle-Grade fiction is written to both entertain and, in some way, to explain certain aspects of life. It makes it easier for me to stomach. Does that make sense? Probably not.

Bitesize Book Reviews 11

books, reviews
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Once again, I found myself without much to review because I’m still doing terribly at reading. In order to get this post up, I listened to 3 audiobooks on Monday. They were all short and free with my Audible subscription. I guess my lack of organisation is helping me experience books that I’d never have picked up normally. If only I could get through the books on my TBR as easily.

Book Review – The Royal Rabbits of London by Santa Montefiore, Simon Sebag Montefiore

books, reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

As kids, my sisters and I were obsessed with any film, TV show or book about animals. Anything that personified animals was perfect. It’s something that hasn’t really left me as I got older, which is why I was so excited to see this in the charity shop. Personified rabbits who are tasked with looking after the Queen? I’m not exactly pro-Royal but that sounded like a lot of fun. I had to buy it and I couldn’t wait to read it. But would it really be as good as it sounded?

Book Review – The Highland Falcon Thief by M.G. Leonard and Sam Sedgman

books, reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

First things first, my family bloody love trains. We get especially excited about steam trains. It fills me with absolute joy that my niece is finally reaching an age where she’s starting to want to play with our old train set. She’s still not quite got to grips with it but it gives me plenty of excuses to play with it myself. I could easily see myself becoming one of those model train people. If I had enough room, I’d definitely set one up permanently. So, as you can probably tell, I was really excited at the prospect of a series of children’s mysteries set on trains. It was everything I could have wanted.

Sunday Rundown: That’s What She Read

books, films, rundown
Sunday Rundown

What have you been reading this week?

We’ve nearly made it through the first month of 2022 and it looks as though nothing is going to change quickly. Although I have managed to read quite a few books so far. It’s certainly refreshing to be able to pick up whichever book I want without having to think about the title. Maybe I’ll actually get some crossed off my TBR this year. That’s if I can stop myself from buying new ones, of course.

Book Review – The Good Thieves by Katherine Rundell

books, reviews

Rating: 4 out of 5.

This week I’ve unexpectedly finished two books. Two books that I wasn’t intending to read but that I managed to listen to as I was working. I’ve had this for a while but never bothered to read it. I do this a lot with middle-grade fiction. I love the idea of them but I don’t read them. I had bought this after reading and enjoying Katherine Rundell’s The Explorer. This one sounded like an equally fun and charming story. Plus, historical children’s books are becoming a thing for me this month.

Sunday Rundown: That’s What She Read

books, films, rundown
Sunday Rundown

What have you been reading this week?

I don’t really know what’s going on this year. January normally drags on and on and on. This year, it’s passing in the blink of an eye. I know that work isn’t as dull as normal but it’s still pretty boring. Still, I have got a full library of audiobooks to keep me going. Sometimes obsessively buying books is a good thing I guess.