SUNDAY RUNDOWN – THAT’S WHAT SHE READ

SUNDAY RUNDOWN – THAT’S WHAT SHE READ

It’s finally 2017 and, like everyone else in the world, I’m hoping this year will see me get my fucking act together. Although, I am well aware that I suck at keeping to resolutions and then feel shitty when I break them. I’ve lost count of how many times I’ve vowed to stop eating chocolate for the year and then, a mere 8 hours into the new year, have been found stuffing my face on left over Christmas chocolate. So this year I’m trying to take some pressure off by not stopping myself doing things but encouraging myself to do stuff. Like read more, drink more water, and get more sleep. It’s my hope that turning resolutions into positives instead of negatives that I’ll be more likely to do them. Plus, they’re super vague so I don’t need to keep to any rigid promises.

Just Finished

  • The Red Virgin and the Vision of Utpoia by Bryan Talbot and Mary Talbot (Kindle edition)

This was my final read of 2016 and another book to cross off my Most Anticipated Fiction of 2016 list. As my Kindle is only a Kindle Paperwhite I don’t have a colour display so the graphic novel wasn’t quite as good as it could have been but, having since seen it on my PC, I can say the artwork is incredible. It’s a great story based on the life of the French Revolutionary Louise Michel. It’s an incredibly story and, though obviously simplified, presented in a digestible and engaging manner. Part of me wishes there could have been more detail and context but I would certainly recommend it. 


Currently Reading

  • Losing It by Emma Rathbone
I fucking hate this book. There is nothing positive I have to say about it so far except that it’s an easy read. The only reason I haven’t given up is because it’s one from my 2016 list. The characters are awful and have no depth to them. The story is the most superficial bullshit I’ve ever read. It’s like an episode of Sex and the City but with less substance. I mean that show was at least trying, and failing, to promote feminism. This is just confirming the notion that not having sex as soon as possible is a crazy and debilitating move. There’s no balanced argument here. It feels like it was written by someone from Cosmopolitan. It’d be fucking toxic for young women to read.

Recently Purchased
  • What haven’t I bought this month
This has been quite a heavy book buying month so I’ve decided to just shove it all in one section to avoid a huge list of stuff. They’re mainly books from my 2016 list but there are a few oddities that I’ve either wanted to read for a while or that just took my fancy.

  1. Vinegar Girl by Anne Tyler
    • A book I’ve wanted to read since January. It sounds like a glorious reworking of a problematic Shakespeare play.
  2. The Red Virgin and the Vision of Utopia by Mary and Bryan Talbot (Kindle edition)
    • See above.
  3. American Gods by Neil Gaiman (Kindle edition)
    • Already own a copy of this but it’s a massive hardback. I wanted to reread it before the series but feel a Kindle edition is easier to read.
  4. Nod by Adrian Barnes (Kindle edition and audible audiobook)
    • Bought on a whim but sounds pretty cool. Only a handful of people are able to sleep and those that do start having weird dreams. The others only have a few weeks before their bodies start to die.
  5. Strange Weather in Tokyo by Hiromi Kawakami (Kindle edition)
    • Something I’ve had in my peripheral vision for a while but only just bought it. It’s the love story between a woman and her ex-teacher, 30 years her senior. It sounds cute.
  6. The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey (Kindle edition and audible audiobook)
    • This is one of those books people have been talking about forever so I decided, when it was on offer in the Kindle store, that it was time to get on board. 
  7. Mr Splitfoot by Samantha Hunt 
    • Another one to cross off my 2016 list.
  8. Eleven Hours by Pamela Erens
    • Another one to cross off my 2016 list.
  9. The Fat Artist and Other Stories by Benjamin Hale
    • Another one to cross off my 2016 list.
  10. The Noise of Time by Julian Barnes
    • Another one to cross off my 2016 list.
  11. Jonathan Unleashed by Meg Rosoff (Kindle edition)
    • Another one to cross off my 2016 list.
  12. I Am No One by Patrick Flanery (Kindle edition)
    • Another one to cross off my 2016 list.
See I told you it was a lot. I’ve managed to find quite a few cheap copies of books I’ve wanted to read all year so I’ll hopefully cross them off my list soon. 

Recently Watched
  • The Nice Guys
I needed something to write about on Tuesday. I’ve only heard good things about this so it sounded ideal. See you soon.  
Most Anticipated Books of 2017

Most Anticipated Books of 2017

It’s nearly the start of January 2017 and, after my last post looked back on my last year, this one is looking forward to the next. In 2016 I made the resolution to read more books but didn’t do a great job. This year I hope to get better at reading and, by giving up on books as soon as I stop enjoying them, will hopefully stop falling into reading slumps. So, to inspire me to get stuff finished I’ve created a follow-up to my incredibly popular ‘Most Anticipated Books of 2016’ post with a few of my Most Anticipated Books of 2017. This is only a short number of the huge list I had at one point. It looks as if I’m not going to curb my spending this year. Ah well.



2017 fiction releases I’m excited about

  • Men Without Women by Haruki Murakami

Murakami is one of my favourite writers and this is his first big work of fiction since Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki. This new release will be a collection of seven short stories about single men. This is the 2017 release that I’m most excited about and I can’t wait to read it.

  • Woman No. 17 by Edan Lepucki

This is supposed to be a darkly funny, noir novel about art, motherhood and female friendship. It’s a story about a female writer who hired a young woman to care for her son whilst she works. The new member of the family quickly integrates herself but things start to take a dark turn. It sounds intense.

  • The Answers by Catherine Lacey

This is Lacey’s second novel and it introduces us to a young woman who is living in constant pain. In order to pay for her experimental treatment, she takes part in a Girlfriend Experiment to play the girlfriend of an eccentric actor. It sounds like an interesting concept.

  • Homesick for Another World by Ottessa Moshfegh

I’m going to be honest and tell you that I haven’t finished Eileen yet but this collection of short stories by its writer sounds amazing. It’s a collection concerning characters that are all unsteady in their own way. Wanting to be better or more connected, they are their own worst enemies. Doesn’t that sound amazing?

  • Norse Anthology by Neil Gaiman

I’m so excited about this that I’ve pre-ordered it. I love Neil Gaiman and I love Norse mythology so this book is kind of perfect for me. I can’t wait to see Gaiman’s take on these Norse tales.

  • The Seventh Function of Language by Laurent Binet

This book sounds bloody incredible. It offers a different perspective on Roland Barthes’ death and includes a line-up of literary greats. It sounds like a better version of the DaVinci Code but with more about literary theory.

  • Difficult Women by Roxanne Gay

Roxanne Gay set the literary world on fire with her essay collection Bad Feminist  which she is set to follow up this year with Hunger. However, before that is released Gay’s first collection of short stories is set to be published. They describe women in a variety of situations but, considering Gay’s reputation as a writer, it is bound to be a great representation of modern America.

  • Ill Will by Dan Chaon

Ill Will tells the story of two unsolved crimes, one in the past and the other in the present. The two are linked by one man. The story looks at the problem of memory and the dangers of self-deception. It’s a psychological thriller that I could actually get on board with.

  • The Twelve Lives of Samuel Hawley by Hannah Tinti

This novel tells the story of a criminal who is raising his daughter on the run. They move from motel to motel and always watch their back. Now, Samuel, wants his daughter to have a normal life. As they settle down for good, the father and daughter must come to terms with his past as it threatens their present. Sounds like a Tarantino movie or something. I love it.

  • Universal Harvester by John Darnielle

I really enjoyed Wolf in White Van so I’m really looking forward to Darnielle’s follow-up. It concerns a man working at a video rental store who investigates when customers start complaining that there is something strange on one of the VHS tapes. If it’s anything like his previous novel, this will be haunting but brilliant.

  • Flaneuse by Lauren Elkin

This book, part cultural retrospective and part memoir, traces the relationship between women and their cities. Elkin looks into the lives of these women in order to map her own life. It sounds like a different read and I’m pretty excited by it.

  • Idaho by Emily Ruskovich

This debut novel deals with memory, love ad forgiveness. As a wife must come to terms with her husband’s fading memory she attempts to piece together her husband’s past. I’ve heard good things about this and Ruskovich’s writing.

  • Fever Dream by Samanta Schweblin

A young woman lies in a hospital bed with a young boy sitting by her bed. It sounds creepy and haunting and I can’t wait.

  • The Animators by Kayla Rae Whitaker

This tells the story of two women in the world of animation. After the release of their first feature pushes them into the limelight, they find their friendship being put to the test. As a lover of animation and well-written stories about well-written women this sounds ideal. I’m looking forward to it. It’s had some good write-ups so far.

  • Somebody with a Litte Hammer by Mary Gaitskill

Mary Gaitskill, the essayist, brings together a series of essays on topics including all things literary, social, cultural, and personal. This is bound to be an engaging and interesting set of essays.

  • Marlena by Julie Buntin

This novel tells the story of two young girls and their turbulent friendship. Their behaviour gets more troubled and outrageous and ends with one girl dead. Years later, the survivor is still haunted by the past and, when a ghost from that year comes resurfaces, she has to come to terms with these events. This sounds like it will be an in-depth study of a friendship and the effect that people have on our lives.

  • South and West by Joan Didion 

This brings together two extended excerpts from the best-selling author’s never-seen-before notebooks. I think it will be interesting to have a greater insight into the mind of the writer and her process.