Bookish Post – Spell the Month in Book Titles: August

books

August is the first in a run of long month names. For the rest of the year, I’m going to have to be smart to get every letter crossed off. I’m already panicking about September and we’re only 2 days in. But enough of this month. How did I do last month? Did I cross off every letter? Including those two pesky U’s?

A

The Appeal by Janice Hallett

Book 2 of the month.

Synopsis:

ONE MURDER. FIFTEEN SUSPECTS.
CAN YOU UNCOVER THE TRUTH?

There is a mystery to solve in the sleepy town of Lower Lockwood. It starts with the arrival of two secretive newcomers, and ends with a tragic death. Roderick Tanner QC has assigned law students Charlotte and Femi to the case. Someone has already been sent to prison for murder, but he suspects that they are innocent. And that far darker secrets have yet to be revealed…

Throughout the amateur dramatics society’s disastrous staging of All My Sons and the shady charity appeal for a little girl’s medical treatment, the murderer hid in plain sight. Will Charlotte and Femi solve the case? Will you?

Read my review.

U

Ursula K. Le Guin: The Last Interview and Other Conversations

Book 4 of the month.

Synopsis:

“Resistance and change often begin in art. Very often in our art, the art of words.”
—Ursula K. Le Guin

When she began writing in the 1960s, Ursula K. Le Guin was as much of a literary outsider as one can be: a woman writing in a landscape dominated by men, a science fiction and fantasy author in an era that dismissed “genre” literature as unserious, and a westerner living far from fashionable East Coast publishing circles. The interviews collected here—spanning a remarkable forty years of productivity, and covering everything from her Berkeley childhood to Le Guin envisioning the end of capitalism—highlight that unique perspective, which conjured some of the most prescient and lasting books in modern literature.

Read my review.

G

Girl, Woman, Other by Bernardine Evaristo

Book 6 of the month.

Synopsis:

This is Britain as you’ve never read it.
This is Britain as it has never been told.

From Newcastle to Cornwall, from the birth of the twentieth century to the teens of the twenty-first, Girl, Woman, Other follows a cast of twelve characters on their personal journeys through this country and the last hundred years. They’re each looking for something – a shared past, an unexpected future, a place to call home, somewhere to fit in, a lover, a missed mother, a lost father, even just a touch of hope . . .

Read my review.

U

The Unfortunates by B.S. Johnson

Book 5 of the month.

Synopsis:

A sports journalist, sent to a Midlands town on a weekly assignment, finds himself confronted by ghosts from the past when he disembarks at the railway station. Memories of one of his best, most trusted friends, a tragically young victim of cancer, begin to flood through his mind as he attempts to go about the routine business of reporting a football match.

B S Johnson’s famous ‘book in a box’, in which the chapters are presented unbound, to be read in any order the reader chooses, is one of the key works of a novelist now undergoing an enormous revival of interest. The Unfortunates is a book of passionate honesty and dark, courageous humour: a meditation on death and a celebration of friendship which also offers a remarkably frank self-portrait of its author.

Read my review.

S

Summerwater by Sarah Moss

Book 3 of the month.

Synopsis:

It is the summer solstice, but in a faded Scottish cabin park the rain is unrelenting. Twelve people on holiday with their families look on as the skies remain resolutely grey. A woman goes running up the Ben as if fleeing; a teenage boy chances the dark waters of the loch in his kayak; a retired couple head out despite the downpour, driving too fast on the familiar bends.

But there are newcomers too, and one particular family, a mother and daughter with the wrong clothes and the wrong manners, start to draw the attention of the others. Who are they? Where are they from? Should they be here at all? As darkness finally falls, something is unravelling . . .

Read my review.

T

The Tenets in the Tattoos by Becky James

Book 1 of the month.

Synopsis:

Thorrn is an accomplished swordsman desperate for his promotion. But when the king orders that he hand over a girl from Earth, Thorrn’s soul companion, Thorrn struggles to obey. If he doesn’t bow to the king’s wishes, he will be executed.

Aubin is sick of being an apothecary. Unable to defeat death, chafing at injustices piled on him, he’s ready to quit. But when he sees someone in distress and realises he could help, he is confronted with a life-changing choice – he will have to commit treason to remedy this.

Working together, the swordsman and the apothecarist come up with an unlikely plan. Only if they trust each other and put their egos aside can they defeat their common enemy. But do they even have a common enemy, and can the apothecarist be trusted at all…?

A swordsman, an apothecarist, a shy librarian (“I’m beginning to think being underestimated is kind of my superpower”), and a powerful mage. Only they can save the kingdom.

A page-turning new adventure awaits, from a fresh voice in fantasy. Contains twinned souls with a twist, enemies to inseparable friends, coming of age, learning to accept yourself and others, some epic swordfights, and a smattering of romance.

Read my review.

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